Duke of York’s Theatre

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Duke of York’s Theatre

Duke of York’s Theatre London

 

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The Duke of York’s Theatre is a West End Theatre in St Martin’s Lane, in the City of Westminster, London. It was built for Frank Wyatt and his wife, Violet Melnotte, who retained ownership of the theatre until her death in 1935. It opened on 10 September 1892 as theTrafalgar Square Theatre, with Wedding Eve. The theatre, designed by architect Walter Emden became known as the Trafalgar Theatre in 1894 and the following year became the Duke of York’s to honour the future King George V.

 


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Address – 104 Saint Martin’s Lane London WC2N 4BG UK.
Box Office – Daily – Phone – 844 871 7627
 

Transport–  Leicester Square (Northern and Piccadilly lines)

Bus – From the Strand 6, 9, 11, 15, 23, 91 and 139 – From Charing Cross 24, 29, 47 and 176

 


Theatre Facilities

 

Wheelchair Access

There are two spaces for wheelchair users in the third row of the Royal Circle at seats RC C 23 and C1. There is space for two wheelchairs and one scooter.

 

Hearing

There is a dual channel infra-red system available with two head sets. Also a Portable induction loop is fitted at the Box Office.

GUIDE DOGS

Up to 4 Guide dogs are allowed inside the auditorium.

Please contact 020 7565 6500 for disabled bookings and queries.

 

HISTORY


 

The Duke of York’s Theatre is a West End Theatre in St Martin’s Lane, in the City of Westminster, London. It was built for Frank Wyatt and his wife, Violet Melnotte, who retained ownership of the theatre until her death in 1935. It opened on 10 September 1892 as the Trafalgar Square Theatre, with Wedding Eve. The theatre, designed by architect Walter Emden became known as the Trafalgar Theatre in 1894 and the following year became the Duke of York’s to honour the future King George V.

One of the earliest musical comedies, Go-Bang, was a success at the theatre in 1894. In 1900, Jerome K. Jerome’s Miss Hobbs was staged as well as David Belasco’s Madame Butterfly, which was seen by Puccini, who later turned it into the famous opera. This was also the theatre where J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up debuted on 27 December 1904. Many famous British actors have appeared here, including Basil Rathbone, who played Alfred de Musset in Madame Sand in June 1920, returning in November 1932 as the Unknown Gentleman in Tonight or Never.

The theatre was Grade II listed by English Heritage in September 1960.  In the late 1970s the freehold of the theatre was purchased by Capital Radio and it closed in 1979 for refurbishment. It reopened in February 1980 and the first production under the patronage of Capital Radio was Rose, starring Glenda Jackson. In 1991 comedian Pat Condell performed sketches at the theatre which were later released onto DVD.

The Ambassador Theatre Group bought the theatre in 1992; this coincided with the successful Royal Court production of Ariel Dorfman’sDeath and the Maiden. A host of successes followed including Richard O’Brien’s The Rocky Horror Show (celebrating its 21st Birthday) and the hugely successful Royal Court Classics Season in 1995.

The theatre is the London headquarters of the Ambassador Theatre Group, as well as the producing offices of their subsidiary Sonia Friedman Productions, whose revival of In Celebration starring Hollywood leading man Orlando Bloom played until 15 September 2007.

 

RECENT AND FUTURE PRODUCTIONS


 

  • A doll’s house (20 August – 26 October 2013) by Henrik Ibsen
  • After Mrs Rochester (22 July 2003 – 25 October 2003) by Polly Teale
  • Sweet Panic (12 November 2004 – 7 February 2004) by Stephen Poliakoff
  • Calico (3 March 2004 – 3 April 2004) by Michael Hastings
  • The Holy Terror (14 April 2004 – 8 May 2004) by Simon Gray
  • Dirty Blonde (16 June 2004 – 28 August 2004) by Claudia Shear
  • Journey’s End (5 October 2004 – 19 February 2005) by R.C. Sherriff
  • The Dresser (28 February 2005 – 14 May 2005) by Ronald Harwood, starring Nicholas Lyndhurst and Julian Glover
  • Hedda Gabler (27 May 2005 – 6 August 2005) by Henrik Ibsen, starring Eve Best and Iain Glen
  • Tom, Dick and Harry (23 August 2005 – 29 October 2005) by Ray Cooney and Michael Cooney, starring Joe, Stephen and Mark McGann
  • I Am My Own Wife (10 November 2005 – 10 December 2005) by Doug Wright, starring Jefferson Mays
  • Embers (1 March 2006 – 24 June 2006) by Sandor Marai, adapted by Christopher Hampton, starring Jeremy Irons and Patrick Malahide
  • Eh Joe (27 June 2006 – 15 July 2006) by Samuel Beckett, starring Michael Gambon
  • Rock ‘n’ Roll (22 July 2006 – 24 February 2007) by Tom Stoppard, starring David Calder, Emma Fielding, Dominic West, Rufus Sewell, and Nicola Bryant
  • Little Shop of Horrors (12 March 2007 – 23 June 2007) by Alan Menken, starring Sheridan Smith, Paul Keating and Alistair McGowan
  • In Celebration (5 July 2007 – 15 September 2007) by David Storey, starring Orlando Bloom, Tim Healy and Lynda Baron
  • Rent Remixed (16 October 2007 – 2 February 2008[4]), by Jonathan Larson, starring Denise Van Outen (succeeded on 24 December 2007 by Jessie Wallace)
  • The Magic Flute (8 February 2008 – 12 April 2008)
  • That Face (1 May 2008 – 5 July 2008) by Polly Stenham, starring Lindsay Duncan, Hannah Murray and Matt Smith
  • Under the Blue Sky (25 July 2008 – 20 September 2008) by David Eldridge, starring Catherine Tate, Francesca Annis and Dominic Rowan
  • No Man’s Land (7 October 2008 – 3 January 2009) by Harold Pinter, starring Michael Gambon, David Bradley, David Walliams and Nick Dunning
  • A View From the Bridge (5 February 2009 – 16 May 2009) by Arthur Miller, starring Ken Stott
  • Arcadia (27 May 2009 – 12 September 2009) by Tom Stoppard starring Samantha Bond, Nancy Carroll, Jessie Cave, Trevor Cooper, Sam Cox, Lucy Griffiths, Tom Hodgkins, Hugh Mitchell, Neil Pearson, George Potts, Dan Stevens and Ed Stoppard
  • Speaking in Tongues (18 September 2009 – 12 December 2009) by Andrew Bovell starring John Simm
  • Ghost Stories (25 June 2010 – 16 July 2011) by Jeremy Dyson and Andy Nyman starring Andy Nyman, David Cardy, Ryan Gage and Nicholas Burns
  • Journey’s End (19 July 2011 – 3 September 2011) by RC Sherriff, directed by David Grindley
  • Backbeat (10 October 2011 – 18 February 2012), co-written by Iain Softley and Stephen Jeffreys, musical direction by Paul Stacey, and directed by David Leveaux.[5]
  • All New People (22 February 2012 – 28 April 2012) by Zach Braff, directed by Peter DuBois, starring Zach Braff, Eve Myles, Paul Hilton and Susannah Fielding.[6]
  • Posh (23 May 2012 – 4 August 2012) (transfers from the Royal Court Theatre)
  • Jumpy (28 August 2012 – 3 November 2012) by April de Angelis, starring Tamsin Greig
  • Constellations (16 November 2012 – 5 January 2013) by Nick Payne, starring Sally Hawkins and Rafe Spall (transfers from the Royal Court Theatre)
  • The Judas Kiss (17 January 2013 – 6 April 2013) by David Hare, starring Rupert Everett and Freddie Fox (transfers from the Hampstead Theatre)
  • Passion Play (7 May 2013 – 3 August 2013) by Peter Nichols, starring Zoë Wanamaker
  • A Doll’s House (14 August 2013 – 26 October 2013) by Henrik Ibsen, starring Hattie Morahan
  • Jeeves and Wooster in Perfect Nonsense (12 November 2013 – ) by PG Wodehouse, starring Stephen Mangan and Matthew Macfadyen

 

adlwych Theatre London at theatregold.net