London Coliseum

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London Coliseum

London Coliseum

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The London Coliseum (also known as the Coliseum Theatre) is a theatre in St. Martin’s Lane, central London, built as one of London’s largest and most luxurious ‘family’ variety theatres. Opened on 24 December 1904 as the London Coliseum Theatre of Varieties, the theatre was designed by theatrical architect Frank Matcham (designer of the London Palladium) for impresario Oswald Stoll.

 


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Address – St Martin’s Lane, Charing Cross, London WC2N 4ES.

Box Office – Daily – Phone – +44 20 7836 0111
 

Transport  Tube :  Leicester Square  

Bus :  3, 6, 9, 11, 12, 13, 15, 23, 24, 29, 53, 77a, 88, 91, 139, 159,176

 


Theatre Facilities

 Wheelchair Access

There are two wheelchair spaces in the Stalls, two wheelchair spaces in the Dress Circle and four wheelchair space in the Stalls Boxes. Also, transfer seats for those who are able to transfer out of their wheelchairs, comprising four in the Dress Circle and six in the Balcony.

Hard of Hearing

They offer an enhanced sound system via headphones. To request this, please visit the Information Desk in the London Coliseum foyer.

Guide Dogs

Blind patrons may not take their guide dogs into the auditorium, but the theatre management staff will be more than happy to look after them during the performance.

For access information and to book, please contact the venue on 020 7845 9300.

 

HISTORY


The London Coliseum (also known as the Coliseum Theatre) is a theatre in St. Martin’s Lane, central London, built as one of London’s largest and most luxurious ‘family’ variety theatres. Opened on 24 December 1904 as the London Coliseum Theatre of Varieties, the theatre was designed by theatrical architect Frank Matcham (designer of the London Palladium) for impresario Oswald Stoll. Their ambition was to build the largest and finest music hall, described as the ‘people’s palace of entertainment’ of its age. At the time of construction, it was the only theatre in Europe that provided lifts for taking patrons to the upper levels of the theatre, and was the first theatre in England to have a triple revolve installed on its stage. It is currently the home of the English National Opera.

 

COLISEUM HISTORY


 

The inaugural performance was a variety bill on 24 December 1904.

In 1908, the London Coliseum was host to a cricket match between Middlesex and Surrey.

In 1911, dramatist W. S. Gilbert produced his last play here, The Hooligan.

The theatre changed its name from the London Coliseum to the Coliseum Theatre between 1931 and 1968 when a run of 651 performances of the musical comedy White Horse Inn began on 8 April 1931. It reverted to the original name when the Sadler’s Wells Opera Company moved there in 1968. The Company changed its name to the English National Opera in 1974 and bought the freehold of the building for £12.8m.

Beginning on 16 June 1963, the theatre became the second of London’s three Cinerama Theatres, initially showing the three-strip Technicolor version for the first 5 months, then showing the 70mm single-strip film until 22 May 1968 when it screened its final movie.

It has the widest proscenium arch in London and was one of the first to have electric lighting. It was built with a revolving stage although this was rarely used. The theatre retains many of its original features and was Grade II* listed by English Heritage in September 1960. The design team for the refurbishment included the architects RHWL and Arup for acousticians and building engineers.

The theatre hosted both the 2004 and 2006 Royal Variety Performances. The theatre is also the London base for performances by English National Ballet, who perform regular seasons throughout the year when not on tour.

 

TECHNICAL ASPECTS


Owing to the constricted site on which it was constructed the wing space is limited, although the stage depth partly compensates for this. The stage is not raked.

 

adlwych Theatre London at theatregold.net