Lyceum Theatre

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Lyceum Theatre

Lyceum Theatre London

 

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Lyceum Theatreis a 2,100-seat West End theatre located in the City of Westminster, on Wellington Street, just off the Strand. There has been a theatre with this name in the locality since 1765. From 1794 to 1809, however, the building hosted a circus produced by Philip Astley, a chapel, the first London exhibition of waxworks displayed by Madame Tussaud, and other entertainments.

 


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Address – 21 Wellington St, London WC2E 7RQ UK.
 

Box Office – Monday 10am – 6pm Tues – Sat 10am – 8pm Sun 11am – 3 pm

 

Phone – +44 844 871 7627 – Access Bookings: 0844 871 3000

 

Transport  Tube :  Covent Garden (Piccadilly Line) and Charing Cross (Northern and Bakerloo lines) Bus  6, 11, 13, and 15

 


Theatre Facilities

 

Wheelchair Access

The venue has wheelchair spaces and transfers are available too. Please call 0844 871 3006 to book. The wheelchair accessible entrance is via a double EXIT door situated at the front of the theatre on Wellington Street, to the left of the five main doors. This is clearly marked and provides level access to the Accessible Toilets and the Stalls seating area. Upon arrival, please notify the Doorman who will open the doors for you. From the accessible entrance, a gentle slope leads past the Accessible Toilets to the Stalls seating area and the Stalls Bar, which is fully accessible.

Hearing

There is a Infa-red loop system for the hard of hearing. There is also a induction loop in the box office.

GUIDE DOGS

Guide dogs are allowed into the auditorium by prior arrangement with the Box Office. Alternatively, the staff can dog-sit throughout the performance.

 

HISTORY


 

The Lyceum Theatre is a 2,100-seat West End theatre located in the City of Westminster, on Wellington Street, just off the Strand. There has been a theatre with this name in the locality since 1765. From 1794 to 1809, however, the building hosted a circus produced by Philip Astley, a chapel, the first London exhibition of waxworks displayed by Madame Tussaud, and other entertainments. From 1816 to 1830, it served as The English Opera House. After a fire, the house was rebuilt and reopened on 14 July 1834 to a design by Samuel Beazley. The building was unique in that it has a balcony overhanging the dress circle. It was built by the partnership of Peto & Grissell. The theatre then played opera, adaptations of Charles Dickens novels and James Planché’s “fairy extravaganzas”, among other works.

From 1871 to 1902, Henry Irving appeared at the theatre in, especially, Shakespeare, usually starring opposite Ellen Terry. In 1904 the theatre was almost completely rebuilt and richly ornamented in rococo style by Bertie Crewe, but it retained Beazley’s façade and grand portico. It played mostly melodrama over the ensuing decades. The building closed in 1939 and was set to be demolished, but it was saved and converted into a Mecca Ballroom in 1951, where many well-known bands played. The Lyceum was closed in 1986 but restored to theatrical use in 1996 by Holohan Architects. Since 1999, the theatre has hosted The Lion King.

 

Lyceum Theatre London at theatregold.net